Skip to main content

Travel Advisories

Updated from the U.S Department of State — Bureau of Consular Affairs  (Website)

January 18, 2022
Ghana - Level 3: Reconsider Travel

Reconsider travel to Ghana due to COVID-19

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.     

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 3 Travel Health Notice for Ghana due to COVID-19.    

Ghana has resumed most transportation options (including airport operations and re-opening of borders), and business operations. Visit the Embassy's COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Ghana.

Exercise increased caution in:

Urban areas due to crime.

  • Intercity highways after dark due to crime.
  • Areas near the northern border in the Upper East and Upper West regions due to crime.
  • Parts of the Bono East, Bono, Savannah, Northern, North East, and Upper East regions due to civil unrest.

Read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Ghana:

  • Individuals arriving in Ghana by air must present a negative COVID-19 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test conducted by an accredited laboratory in the country of origin not more than 72 hours prior to departure

  • Upon arrival, each traveler age five and over must undergo a temperature screening and COVID-19 test conducted at the airport

  • As of 12 December 2021, you must present your COVID-19 Vaccination Record Card in addition to the cost of the test fee of $150 per person. Travelers MUST pay the fee online before departure at https://myfrontierhealthcare.com/Home/Ghana and present proof of payment along with your vaccination record to the airline prior to boarding

  • Test results will usually be available within 30 minutes. Travelers who test negative for COVID-19 will be allowed to enter Ghana with no quarantine requirement. Those who test positive for COVID-19 will complete arrival procedures with the help of airport health officials before transfer to Ga East Municipal Hospital for clinical assessment and management. Individuals who depart Ghana and return within one week will not need to present a negative PCR COVID-19 test. However, they will still be subject to testing upon arrival at the airport

  • The wearing of a mask in public is required. Non compliance will result in a fine of 12,000 to 60,000 Ghanaian cedis or in US dollars ($2,060.09 to $10,300.43) and/or a prison sentence of four to ten years

  • See the U.S. Embassy's web page regarding COVID-19
  • Visit the CDC’s webpage on Travel and COVID-19.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Review the Crime and Safety Report for Ghana.
  • U.S. citizens who travel abroad should always have a contingency plan for emergency situations.  Review the Traveler’s Checklist.

Urban Areas – Exercise Increased Caution

Violent crime, such as street mugging, is more frequent in urban areas as compared to their surrounding suburbs. These crimes are also more prevalent at night and in isolated locations.

The U.S. government has limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens. Local police may lack the resources to respond effectively to more serious crimes.

Intercity Highways After Dark – Exercise Increased Caution

Armed assaults on private vehicles and public transports occur more frequently after dark, often by criminal elements using blockades to slow down and restrict movement of vehicles.

Areas Near the Northern Border in the Upper East and Upper West Regions – Exercise Increased Caution

U.S. citizens traveling in Ghana should exercise caution while visiting border areas, in particular the northern border, and be sure to stay abreast of any regional Travel Advisory updates or Security Alerts affecting those areas.

Parts of the Bono East, Bono, Savannah, Northern, North East, and Upper East Regions – Exercise Increased Caution

Civil unrest due to tribal disputes can occur at any time.  While such disputes are typically non-violent, the likelihood for violence developing from a tribal dispute is greater in parts of these regions.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Need Assistance?

Contact Us

Let us help get you the information you need.

We use cookies to give you the best online experience. Please review our use of cookies and accept to continue.

Back to top